Spoonful of honey boosts energy

ANCIENT Greek athletes consumed honey to boost their energy and performance levels during Olympics events as it contains glucose and fructose, known to produce tremendous reserves of glycogen in the liver. Having a spoonful of unprocessed honey before bed can support your brain function. The fructose is stored as energy reserves in the liver, ready to fuel the brain overnight. Indeed, honey boosts the immune system and has an antibacterial effect internally and externally, helping the body to heal.

Colds are caused by viruses and honey is a natural antiviral. In a Pennsylvania State College of Medicine study, a spoonful of honey outperformed over-the-counter cold remedies, according to a Penn State statement.

Research in 2007 by Shone Blair at Sydney University concluded that honey dressings for superbug wound infections should be used as a ‘first choice‘.

Honey supports friendly gut bacteria, aiding digestion, and is good for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and thrush. According to previous studies, one should consume take two teaspoons three times a day for gastric ulcers.To develop the nanoparticle, Green’’s team started with store-bought small molecules and systematically mixed combinations together to generate chemical reactions that resulted in different polymers.

They then mixed DNA that encodes a glowing protein with each different polymer to allow the DNA to bind to the polymers and form nanoparticles.

Each different sample was added to human brain tumor cells and human brain tumor stem cells.

After 48 hours, the team examined and counted how many cells glowed from having taken up the nanoparticles and made the glowing protein encoded by the introduced DNA. The team rated success by counting how many cells survived and what percentage of those cells glowed.

Of the many combinations they tested, the researchers found that one particular formulation of so-called poly(beta-amino ester) nanoparticles did particularly well at getting into both glioblastoma and brain tumor stem cells.The researchers then freeze-dried these nanoparticles and stored them at different temperatures (freezer, refrigerator and room temperature) for different lengths of time (one, two and up to three months), and then retested their ability to get into cells. According to Green, after six months storage, the effectiveness dropped by about half, but they found that up to three months storage at room temperature there was virtually no change in effectiveness.

Furthermore, the team found that certain nanoparticles had a particular affinity for brain tumor cells over healthy brain cells.

The study will be published in the journal.But researchers unconnected to the new work suggest that it might take more time for those extra prenatal calories to show up in the form of lower cholesterol and blood pressure among adult children.

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